All about non-alcohol related fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

  • In the case of non-alcohol related fatty liver disease, obesity and obesity are almost always the cause.
  • Since non-alcohol related fatty liver disease often affects people with obesity or obesity, a major measure is to lose weight as it reduces the fat content of your liver.

Fatigue and perceived pain in the upper abdomen where the liver sits can be signs of fatty liver disease. Unlike before, we know today that fatty liver is not always alcohol-related.

Therefore, it has also been defined so that today there is also something called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, in English non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Non-alcohol related fatty liver disease – cause

The body’s largest gland is the liver, which has a weight of about 1.5 kilos. In the liver, both nutrients are released and stored in our body. The liver also has a vital task, to harm all residual products from, for example, metabolism and drugs.

Previously, it was believed that all fatty liver is caused by alcohol, which is not correct. In the case of non-alcohol related fatty liver disease, it is instead obesity and obesity that is almost always the cause. There is something called the metabolic syndrome which is a collective name for most risk factors and is linked to cardiovascular disease. Criteria for the metabolic syndrome, which often occur in one person, are:

  • Increased waist size.
  • Prediabetes.
  • Diabetes.
  • Hypertension.
  • High levels of triglycerides.
  • Low levels of HDL.

The latter two are types of blood fats. That the sensitivity to insulin decreases in obesity and obesity is something that is strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease. Therefore, the condition is also much more common in people with obesity or obesity, and as more and more people become overweight, the incidence of non-alcohol-related obesity in the population also increases.

Symptoms of non-alcohol related fatty liver disease

Some diseases are defined as slow progression. This means that for a longer period the disease develops and deteriorates the health of the affected person. In the case of non-alcohol related fatty liver disease which is just such a disease that impairs the function of the liver and increases the risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease, inflammation or scarring of the liver and in the worst case cirrhosis.

You may not necessarily experience symptoms, but in some cases there may be a feeling of any of the following:

  • Tiredness.
  • Pain in the upper part of your stomach (where the liver is located).

Diagnosis of non-alcohol related fatty liver disease

To diagnose non-alcohol related fatty liver disease, the doctor needs to find out the fat content of the liver. It can be done using ultrasound. In unusual cases, you can also use computerography or magnetic camera examination.

The doctor also looks at the underlying causes. If there is obesity or obesity and if you do not drink larger amounts of alcohol, you may suspect that you are affected. Samples are also taken to ascertain the status of blood fats, the risk of diabetes and if there are other causes of liver disease. Sometimes you also need to assess the risk of scarring in the liver.

Treatment for non-alcohol related fatty liver disease

Since non-alcohol-related fatty liver disease often affects people with obesity or obesity, a major measure is to lose weight as it reduces the fat content of your liver, provided you are not affected by scarring in the liver. You can also consider obesity surgery in some cases.

For those who have inflammation of the liver or have diabetes, drug treatment can be started.

Preventive measures for non-alcohol related fatty liver disease

Take control of your weight. Since the majority of people suffering from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease suffer from obesity or obesity, this is a basic preventive measure. Take control of your weight and get help if you need to.

Ways to take control of your weight

  • Reasonable goals – set reasonable goals for your weight loss, perhaps in discussions with counselors or healthcare to get a good foundation.
  • Plan meals – reduce or avoid the amount of foods that store fat in the liver, such as sugars and fast carbohydrates. Although we know that alcohol is not the cause of all fatty liver, alcohol is caloric which in turn is stored in the form of fat in the liver, therefore drink in moderation.
  • Touch you – in general, physical activity is a prerequisite for good health. Set your personal goals, challenge yourself and get started. Half an hour up to an hour of physical activity, such as a brisk walk, three to four times a week reduces the risk of overweight and obesity.

Take care of yourself and your body to avoid being affected by fatty liver and if you suspect you are afflicted, talk to your doctor for further recommendations and advice.

Source: The Medical Journal, Linköping University, Karolinska Institutet

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